Christmas Decor: Scenes of The Christ’s Nativity

Hello, Everyone! I hope you all have enjoyed a delightful Summer! I know you all have ‘Christmas’ in your hearts all year and I thought you would enjoy seeing various scenes of Christ’s Nativity. So, below I’ve included several of those beautiful scenes. Additionally, I’m sharing details about His Nativity and the scenes depicting it courtesy of Wikipedia.

 

The nativity of Jesus or birth of Jesus is described in the gospels of Luke and Matthew. The two accounts agree that Jesus was born in Bethlehem in the time of Herod the Great, that his mother Mary was married to Joseph, who was of Davidic descent and was not his biological father, and that his birth was effected by divine intervention, but the two gospels agree on little else. Matthew does not mention the census, annunciation to the shepherds or presentation in the Temple, and does not give the name of the angel that appeared to Joseph to foretell the birth. In Luke there is no mention of Magi, no flight into Egypt, or Massacre of the Innocents, and the angel who announces the coming birth to Mary is named (as Gabriel).

The consensus of scholars is that both gospels were written about AD 75-85, and while it is possible that Matthew’s account might be based on Luke, or Luke’s on Matthew, the majority conclusion is that the two are independent of each other.

In Christian theology the nativity marks the birth of Jesus in fulfillment of the divine will of God, to save the world from sin. The artistic depiction of the nativity has been an important subject for Christian artists since the 4th century. Since the 13th century, the nativity scene has emphasized the humility of Jesus and promoted a more tender image of him, as a major turning point from the early “Lord and Master” image, mirroring changes in the common approaches taken by Christian pastoral ministry.

The nativity plays a major role in the Christian liturgical year. Christian congregations of the Western tradition (including the Catholic Church, the Western Rite Orthodox, the Anglican Communion, and many Protestants) begin observing the season of Advent four Sundays before Christmas, the traditional feast-day of his birth, which falls on December 25.

Christians of the Eastern Orthodox Church and Oriental Orthodox Church observe a similar season, sometimes called Advent but also called the “Nativity Fast”, which begins forty days before Christmas. Some Eastern Orthodox Christians (e.g. Greeks and Syrians) celebrate Christmas on December 25. Other Orthodox (e.g. Copts, Ethiopians, Georgians, and Russians) celebrate Christmas on (the Gregorian) January 7 (Koiak 29 on coptic calendar) as a result of their churches continuing to follow the Julian calendar, rather than the modern day Gregorian calendar.

 

In the Christian tradition, a nativity scene (also known as a manger scene, crib, crèche (/krɛʃ/or /kreɪʃ/, or in Italian presepio or presepe) is the special exhibition, particularly during the Christmas season, of art objects representing the birth of Jesus.  While the term “nativity scene” may be used of any representation of the very common subject of the Nativity of Jesus in art, it has a more specialized sense referring to seasonal displays, either using model figures in a setting or reenactments called “living nativity scenes” (tableau vivant) in which real humans and animals participate. Nativity scenes exhibit figures representing the infant Jesus, his mother, Mary, and her husband, Joseph.

Other characters from the nativity story, such as shepherds, sheep, and angels may be displayed near the manger in a barn (or cave) intended to accommodate farm animals, as described in the Gospel of Luke. A donkey and an ox are typically depicted in the scene, and the Magi and their camels, described in the Gospel of Matthew, are also included. Several cultures add other characters and objects that may or may not be Biblical.

Saint Francis of Assisi is credited with creating the first live nativity scene in 1223 in order to cultivate the worship of Christ. He himself had recently been inspired by his visit to the Holy Land, where he’d been shown Jesus’s traditional birthplace. The scene’s popularity inspired communities throughout Catholic countries to stage similar pantomimes.

Distinctive nativity scenes and traditions have been created around the world, and are displayed during the Christmas season in churches, homes, shopping malls, and other venues, and occasionally on public lands and in public buildings. Nativity scenes have not escaped controversy, and in the United States their inclusion on public lands or in public buildings has provoked court challenges.

 

 

Nativity of Christ Jesus, John 3:16-17 KJV

Nativity of Christ Jesus, John 3:16-17 KJV

Nativity of Christ Jesus

Nativity of Christ Jesus, John 3:16-17 KJV Nativity of Christ Jesus, John 3:16-17 KJV Nativity of Christ Jesus, John 3:16-17 KJV Nativity of Christ Jesus, John 3:16-17 KJV Nativity of Christ Jesus, John 3:16-17 KJV

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Seeing Creator’s Christmas Gifts

I can see the Creator’s gifts of
Creativity, Artistry, Genius Design, Functional Beauty, Artisanal Craftsmanship
in the inventions humans classify/identify as Christmas Decor (originally created
to celebrate the birth of Christ Jesus into His Earth as a human baby).

Each invention of Christmas Decor is made from, created from, material and skills provided by
the Creator to humans, for our benefit. Therefore, when those inventions are made using Creator’s gifts of Creativity, Artistry, Genius Design, Functional Beauty and Artisanal Craftsmanship for what’s designated as the Christmas Season, those inventions cause me to think fondly of the Creator & His Blessings! The Blessings I think of are Christ Jesus, His prosperity of the body, the soul & household wealth, plus all He created and established for humans to enjoy; His excellence. To me these Blessings are part of the prospering ambiance of Christmas and the inventions classified as Christmas Decor inspire remembrance of those Blessings. From my perspective the excellence of the Christmas Decor is an appreciation of His excellence.

Note:  Christmas Decor = Trees, Wreaths, Garlands, & other Evergreens (represent His Eternal Presence) Pine Cones (Beauty in Creation), Lanterns (represent His Light) Ornaments (Beauty), Table Settings & Dinnerware (Beauty), Fabric/Ribbon, Art, Nativity Statues, Animals/Deer (His Creatures), Snowflakes & Snow-People (represent His Snow)

The Origin of the Word “Christmas”

Nativity of Christ Jesus, John 3:16-17 KJV

Nativity of Christ Jesus

“The word for Christmas in late Old English is Cristes Maesse, the Mass of Christ, first found in 1038, and Cristes-messe, in 1131. In Dutch it is Kerst-misse, in Latin Dies Natalis, whence comes the French Noël, and Italian Il natale; in German Weihnachtsfest, from the preceeding sacred vigil.” ~ Catholic Encyclopedia (1913)

“Christmas (i.e. the Mass of Christ), in the Christian Church, the festival of the nativity of Jesus Christ.” ~ 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica

“Christmas (krĭs′ mas), the day on which the birth of Jesus Christ is observed.  The first certain traces of the festival are found about the time of the Emperor Commodus (180–192 A. D.).  In the reign of Diocletian a churchful of Christians, gathered to celebrate Christmas, were burned by order of the emperor.  The birth was celebrated in May, April and January by the early Christians.  It is almost certain that the 25th of December is not Christ’s birthday, as it is the rainy season in Judæa, and shepherds could hardly be watching their flocks by night in the plains at that time.  The present date came to be used probably because all heathen nations celebrated that season with great festivities, as the old Norse Yule-feast.  The beautiful Christmas carols at first were manger-songs, telling the story of Christ’s birth.  The Christmas-tree with its hanging toys was a custom borrowed from the Romans, and is told about by the poet Vergil.  The visit of Santa Claus bearing gifts belongs properly to December 6, the festival of St. Nicholas.” ~ The New Student’s Reference Work (1914)